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Live Longer, Work Longer? Evidence from Sweden’s Ageing Population

Författare:
Publiceringsår: 2016
Språk: Engelska
Sidor:
Publikation/Tidskrift/Serie: Lund Studies in Economic History
Volym: 75
Dokumenttyp: Doktorsavhandling
Förlag: Department of Economic History, Lund University

Sammanfattning

Popular Abstract in English

Sweden’s elderly population is growing, propelled by a continuous decline in old-age

mortality, while coupled with a persistent replacement level fertility. This

changing age structure increases the per worker cost of providing a given age-vector

of per capita benefits, encompassing costs for pensions, health care, and all

other type of old-age welfare services, which presents a looming challenge for the

welfare state to sustain its social transfer system. Options for tackling this daunting

challenge, such as increasing fertility and immigration levels, cutting benefits and

growing public debts, present numerous obstacles, thus discussion of policy options

has shifted the focus towards extending working life. This book contributes

to this ongoing policy discussion by exploring the recent trends in labor supply,

and investigating the underlying mechanisms driving these trends. The results of

this work illustrate a recent trend of prolonging working life in Sweden, whereby

average labor income has increased at older ages, and younger cohorts have increasingly

postponed their retirement. While these changes are uniform across

individuals of different sexes, occupations, and educational levels, the underlying

mechanisms appear different. These micro mechanisms may have myriad implications

concerning aggregate economic support for the ageing Swedish population.

In this regard, the findings in this book are relevant inputs for assessing the welfare

consequences of population ageing and deriving evidence-based policy options.
Sweden’s elderly population is growing, propelled by a continuous decline in old-age

mortality, while coupled with a persistent replacement level fertility. This

changing age structure increases the per worker cost of providing a given age-vector

of per capita benefits, encompassing costs for pensions, health care, and all

other type of old-age welfare services, which presents a looming challenge for the

welfare state to sustain its social transfer system. Options for tackling this daunting

challenge, such as increasing fertility and immigration levels, cutting benefits and

growing public debts, present numerous obstacles, thus discussion of policy options

has shifted the focus towards extending working life. This book contributes

to this ongoing policy discussion by exploring the recent trends in labor supply,

and investigating the underlying mechanisms driving these trends. The results of

this work illustrate a recent trend of prolonging working life in Sweden, whereby

average labor income has increased at older ages, and younger cohorts have increasingly

postponed their retirement. While these changes are uniform across

individuals of different sexes, occupations, and educational levels, the underlying

mechanisms appear different. These micro mechanisms may have myriad implications

concerning aggregate economic support for the ageing Swedish population.

In this regard, the findings in this book are relevant inputs for assessing the welfare

consequences of population ageing and deriving evidence-based policy options.

Disputation

2016-03-04
14:00
EC3:207, School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Sweden
  • Peder Pedersen (Professor)

Nyckelord

  • Economic History
  • Employment
  • Retirement Behavior
  • Working Life
  • Labor Supply
  • Pension Reform
  • Financial Incentives
  • Population Ageing

Övriga

Published
  • Knut Wicksell Centre for Financial Studies-lup-obsolete
  • Tommy Bengtsson
  • Kirk Scott
  • Åsa Hansson
  • ISSN: 1400-4860

Telefon: 046-222 00 00 (växel)
Postadress: Box 117, 221 00 LUND
Organisationsnummer: 202100-3211
Fakturaadress: Box 188, 221 00 LUND

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